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Mathematics courses are fully aligned to the Common Core. State versions are also available for states that have not adopted CCSS.

MATHEMATICS 6

This course begins by connecting ratio and rate to multiplication and division, allowing students to use ratio reasoning to solve a wide variety of problems. Students further apply their understanding of multiplication and division to explain the standard procedure for dividing fractions. This course builds upon previous notions of the number system to now include the entire set of rational numbers. Students begin to understand the use of variables as they write, evaluate, and simplify expressions. They use the idea of equality and properties of operations to solve one-step equations and inequalities. In statistics, students explore different graphical ways to display data. They use data displays, measures of center, and measures of variability to summarize data sets. The course concludes with students reasoning about relationships among shapes to determine area, surface area, and volume.

MATHEMATICS 7

This course begins with an in-depth study of proportional reasoning during which students utilize concrete models such as bar diagrams and tables to increase and develop conceptual understanding of rates, ratios, proportions, and percentages. Students’ number fluency and understanding of the rational number system are extended as they perform operations with signed rational numbers embedded in real-world contexts. In statistics, students develop meanings for representative samples, measures of central tendency, variation, and the ideal representation for comparisons of given data sets. Students develop an understanding of both theoretical and experimental probability. Throughout the course, students build fluency in writing expressions and equations that model real-world scenarios. They apply their understanding of inverse operations to solve multi-step equations and inequalities. Students build on their proportional reasoning to solve problems about scale drawings by relating the corresponding lengths between objects. The course concludes with a geometric analysis of angle relationships, area, and volume of both two- and three-dimensional figures.

MATHEMATICS 8

The course begins with a unit on input-output relationships that builds a foundation for learning about functions. Students make connections between verbal, numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of relations and apply this knowledge to create linear functions that can be used to model and solve mathematical and real-world problems. Technology is used to build deeper connections among representations. Students focus on formulating expressions and equations, including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation, and writing and solving linear equations and systems of linear equations. Students develop a deeper understanding of how translations, rotations, reflections, and dilations of distances and angles affect congruency and similarity. Students develop rules of exponents and use them to simplify exponential expressions. Students extend rules of exponents as they perform operations with numbers in scientific notation. Estimating and comparing square roots of non-perfect squares to perfect squares exposes students to irrational numbers and lays the foundation for applications such as the Pythagorean theorem, distance, and volume.

PRE-ALGEBRA

This full-year course is designed for students who have completed a middle school mathematics sequence but are not yet algebra ready. This course reviews key algebra readiness skills from the middle grades and introduces basic Algebra I work with appropriate support. Students revisit concepts in numbers and operations, expressions and equations, ratios and proportions, and basic functions. By the end of the course, students are ready to begin a more formal high school Algebra I study.

ALGEBRA I

This full-year course focuses on five critical areas: relationships between quantities and reasoning with equations, linear and exponential relationships, descriptive statistics, expressions and equations, and quadratic functions and modeling. This course builds on the foundation set in middle grades by deepening students’ understanding of linear and exponential functions and developing fluency in writing and solving one-variable equations and inequalities. Students will interpret, analyze, compare, and contrast functions that are represented numerically, tabularly, graphically, and algebraically. Quantitative reasoning is a common thread throughout the course as students use algebra to represent quantities and the relationships among those quantities in a variety of ways. Standards of mathematical practice and process are embedded throughout the course, as students make sense of problem situations, solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically.

GEOMETRY

This course formalizes what students learned about geometry in the middle grades with a focus on reasoning and making mathematical arguments. Mathematical reasoning is introduced with a study of © Copyright Edgenuity, Inc. PAGE 9 Math Courses triangle congruency, including exposure to formal proofs and geometric constructions. Then students extend what they have learned to other essential triangle concepts, including similarity, right-triangle trigonometry, and the laws of sines and cosines. Moving on to other shapes, students justify and derive various formulas for circumference, area, and volume, as well as cross-sections of solids and rotations of two-dimensional objects. Students then make important connections between geometry and algebra, including special triangles, slopes of parallel and perpendicular lines, and parabolas in the coordinate plane, before delving into an in-depth investigation of the geometry of circles. The course closes with a study of set theory and probability, as students apply theoretical and experimental probability to make decisions informed by data analysis.

ALGEBRA II

This course focuses on functions, polynomials, periodic phenomena, and collecting and analyzing data. The course begins with a review of linear and quadratic functions to solidify a foundation for learning these new functions. Students make connections between verbal, numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of functions and apply this knowledge as they create equations and inequalities that can be used to model and solve mathematical and real-world problems. As students refine and expand their algebraic skills, they will draw analogies among the operations and field properties of real numbers and those of complex numbers and algebraic expressions. Mathematical practices and habits of mind are embedded throughout the course, as students solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically.

PRECALCULUS

With an emphasis on function families and their representations, Precalculus is a thoughtful introduction to advanced studies leading to calculus. The course briefly reviews linear equations, inequalities, and systems and moves purposefully into the study of functions. Students then discover the nature of graphs and deepen their understanding of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Scaffolding rigorous content with clear instruction, the course leads students through an advanced study of trigonometric functions, matrices, and vectors. The course concludes with a short study of probability and statistics.

AP® CALCULUS AB

This college-level, yearlong course prepares students for the Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus AB Exam. Major topics of study in this full-year course include a review of pre-calculus, limits, derivatives, definite integrals, mathematical modeling of differential equations, and the applications of these concepts. Emphasis is placed on the use of technology to solve problems and draw conclusions. The course utilizes a multi-representative approach to calculus with concepts and problems expressed numerically, graphically, verbally, and analytically.

MATHEMATICS I

The first in an integrated math series for high school, this course formalizes and extends middle school mathematics, deepening students’ understanding of linear relationships. The course begins with a review of relationships between quantities, building from unit conversion to a study of expressions, equations, and inequalities. Students contrast linear and exponential relationships, including a study of sequences, as well as applications such as growth and decay. Students review one-, two-, and multi-step equations, formally reasoning about each step using properties of equality. Students extend this reasoning to systems of linear equations. Students use descriptive statistics to analyze data before turning their attention to transformations and the relationship between algebra and geometry on the coordinate plane.

MATHEMATICS II

This course begins with a brief exploration of radicals and polynomials before delving into quadratic expressions, equations, and functions, including a derivation of the quadratic formula. Students then embark on a deep study of the applications of probability and develop advanced reasoning skills with a study of similarity, congruence, and proofs of mathematical theorems. Students explore right triangles with an introduction to right triangle trigonometry before turning their attention into the geometry of circles and making informal arguments to derive formulas for the volumes of various solids.

MATHEMATICS III

This course synthesizes previous mathematical learning in four focused areas of instruction. First, students relate visual displays and summary statistics to various types of data and to probability distributions with a focus on drawing conclusions from the data. Then, students embark on an in-depth study of polynomial,rational, and radical functions, drawing on concepts of integers and number properties to understand polynomial operations and the combination of functions through operations. This section of instruction builds to the fundamental theorem of algebra. Students then expand the study of right-triangle trigonometry they began in Mathematics II to include non-right triangles and developing the laws of sines and cosines. Finally, students model an array of real world situations with all the types of functions they have studied, including work with logarithms to solve exponential equations. As they synthesize and generalize what they have learned about a variety of function families, students appreciate the usefulness and relevance of mathematics in the real world.

MATHEMATICAL MODELS WITH APPLICATIONS

Broadening and extending the mathematical knowledge and skills acquired in Algebra I, the primary purpose of this course is to use mathematics as a tool to model real-world phenomena students may encounter daily, such as finance and exponential models. Engaging lessons cover financial topics, including growth, smart money, saving, and installment-loan models. Prior mathematical knowledge is expanded and new knowledge and techniques are developed through real-world application of useful mathematical concepts.

FINANCIAL MATH

Connecting practical mathematical concepts to personal and business settings, this course offers informative and highly useful lessons that challenge students to gain a deeper understanding of financial math. Relevant, project-based learning activities cover stimulating topics such as personal financial planning, budgeting and wise spending, banking, paying taxes, the importance of insurance, long-term investing, buying a house, consumer loans, economic principles, traveling abroad, starting a business, and analyzing business data. Offered as a two-semester course for high school students, this course encourages mastery of math skill sets, including percentages, proportions, data analysis, linear systems, and exponential functions.

CONCEPTS IN PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS

This full-year high school course provides an alternative math credit for students who may not wish to pursue more advanced mathematics courses such as Algebra II and Pre-Calculus. The first half of the course begins with an in-depth study of probability and an exploration of sampling and comparing populations and closes with units on data distributions and data analysis. In the second half of the course, students create and analyze scatterplots and study two-way tables and normal distributions. Finally, students apply probability to topics such as conditional probability, combinations and permutations, and sets.

AP® STATISTICS 2020

This yearlong, college-level course is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement (AP) Statistics exam. Major topics of study include exploring one-and two-variable data, sampling, experimentation, probability, sampling distributions, and statistical inference. These topics are organized into three big ideas: variation and distribution, patterns and uncertainty, data-based predictions, decisions, and conclusions.

STATISTICS 2020

This fourth-year high school math option provides a comprehensive introduction to data analysis and statistics. Students begin by reviewing familiar data displays through a more sophisticated lens before diving into an in-depth study of the normal curve. They then study and apply simple linear regression and explore sampling and experimentation. Next, students review probability concepts and begin a study of random variables. Later topics also include sampling distributions, estimating and testing claims about proportions and means, and inferences and confidence intervals.

TRIGONOMETRY*

In this one-semester course, students use their geometry and algebra skills to begin their study of trigonometry. Students will be required to express understanding using qualitative, quantitative, algebraic, and graphing skills. This course begins with a quick overview of right-triangle relationships before introducing trigonometric functions and their applications. Students explore angles and radian measures, circular trigonometry, and the unit circle. Students extend their understanding to trigonometric graphs, including the effects of translations and the inverses of trigonometric functions. This leads to the laws of sines and cosines, followed by an in-depth exploration of trigonometric identities and applications. This course ends with an introduction to the polar coordinate system, complex numbers, and DeMoivre’s theorem. AP and Advanced Placement are registered trademarks of the College Board. * Courses marked with an asterisk are one-semester courses. 2020 Courses marked with 2020 will be available for back-to-school 2020

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