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ALGEBRA I HONORS

This full-year honors course introduces students to linear, exponential, and quadratic functions by interpreting, analyzing, comparing, and contrasting functions that are represented numerically, tabularly, graphically, and algebraically. Technology is utilized within some lessons to further support students in identifying key features as well as displaying images of the functions. The course builds upon the basic concepts of functions to include transformations of linear and non-linear functions. Students deepen their understanding of quantitative reasoning, piecewise functions, and quadratic functions through performance tasks. The additional performance-based skills allow the honors students to apply more of the concepts taught in the course. The course concludes with students analyzing data through displays and statistical analysis.

GEOMETRY HONORS

The course begins by exploring the foundational concepts of Euclidean Geometry in which students learn the terminology of geometry, measuring, proving theorems, and constructing figures. Students then expand on their knowledge of transformations and complete an assignment on identifying point symmetry as well as completing a performance task on tessellations. The course continues with an in-depth look at triangles where students prove theorems, relating congruency and similarity in terms of transformations, and connecting right triangles relationships to trigonometry. Students study set theory and apply probability through theoretical and experimental probability, two-way tables, and combinations and permutations. With lessons pertaining to quadrilaterals, students can identify the various figures based on their key features. Within the circles units, students identify angles, radii, and chords, perform a performance-based task on tangents, and then compute the circumference and area of various circles. Then students study parabolas, ellipses and hyperbolas before modeling and computing two- and three-dimensional figures.

ALGEBRA II HONORS

The course begins with a review of concepts that will assist students throughout the course, such as literal equations, problem solving, and word problems. Students then progress to a unit on functions where students compute operations of functions, compose of functions, and study inverses of functions. To build on their algebraic skills, students learn about complex numbers and apply them to quadratic functions via completing the square and quadratic formula methods. Next, students solve linear systems and apply their knowledge of the concept to three-by-three systems. An in-depth study on polynomial operations and functions allow students build their knowledge of polynomials algebraically and graphically. In the second semester, students study nonlinear functions. Students solve and graph rational and radical functions whereas the exponential and logarithmic functions focus on the key features and transformations of the functions. Expected value and normal distribution concepts expand and deepen students’ knowledge of probability and statistics. Students also cover trigonometric functions and periodic phenomena.

PRE-CALCULUS HONORS

This full-year advanced math course starts with a unit on the nature of functions and complex numbers before moving into matrices, systems, and linear programming. Students then return to functions with a focus on graphing a variety of function types; this unit includes a performance task on production schemes. Students explore rational functions in depth and then conclude the first semester with right triangle and circular trigonometry. In the second half of the course, students synthesize what they have learned to graph and solve trigonometric functions. They also study vectors, conics and analytic geometry, statistics and probability, mathematical modeling, and sequences and series.

LANGUAGE ARTS 9 HONORS

This freshman honors English course invites students to explore a variety of diverse and complex texts organized into thematic units. Students will engage in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts, both classic and contemporary. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and literary nonfiction, honors students will master comprehension, use evidence to conduct in-depth literary analysis, and examine and critique how authors develop ideas in a variety of genres. Interwoven throughout the lessons are activities that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills, research and critically analyze sources of information, and produce clear, coherent writing. In addition to activities offered to students in core courses, honors students are given additional opportunities to create and to participate in project-based learning activities, including writing a Shakespearian sonnet and creating an original interpretation of a Shakespearian play. Honors students will read a range of classic texts, including Homer’s The Odyssey, Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, Jack London’s “To Build a Fire” and Richard Connell’s “The Most Dangerous Game.” Students will also read Sue Macy’s full length nonfiction work Wheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom (With a Few Flat Tires Along the Way), and will study a variety of short but complex texts, including influential speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Ronald Reagan. Contemporary texts by Richard Preston, Julia Alvarez, and Maya Angelou round out the course.

LANGUAGE ARTS 10 HONORS

This sophomore-year honors English course provides engaging and rigorous lessons with a focus on academic inquiry to strengthen knowledge of language arts. Honors reading lessons require analyzing complex texts, while concise mini-lessons advance writing and research skills to craft strong, compelling essays and projects. Students will write argumentative and analytical essays based on literary texts, as well as an informative research paper using MLA style. Throughout the course, students read a range of classic and contemporary literary texts including Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House, George Orwell’s Animal Farm, and Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis. In addition to reading a wide range of literary texts, students read and analyze complex informational and argumentative texts including Sonia Sotomayor’s “A Latina Judge’s Voice,” Niccolò Machiavelli’s The Prince, and the contemporary informational text Sugar Changed the World: A Story of Magic, Spice, Slavery, Freedom, and Science.

LANGUAGE ARTS 11 HONORS

This junior-year honors English course invites students to delve into American literature from early American Indian voices through contemporary works. Students will engage in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts, including the full length novel The Awakening by Kate Chopin. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and expository nonfiction, honors students will master comprehension, use evidence to conduct in-depth literary analysis, and examine and critique how authors develop ideas in a variety of genres. Interwoven throughout the lessons are activities that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills, research and critically analyze sources of information, and produce clear, coherent writing. To round out the course, students will read a range of short but complex texts, including Henry David Thoreau’s essay “Civil Disobedience,” Floyd Dell’s drama King Arthur’s Socks, and works by Emily Dickinson, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Martin Luther King, Jr., F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sandra Cisneros, Amy Tan, and Dave Eggers.

LANGUAGE ARTS 12 HONORS

This senior-year honors English course invites students to delve into British literature, from ancient texts such as the epic of Beowulf through contemporary works. Students will engage in a variety of rigorous lessons with a focus on academic inquiry, literary analysis, and inferential evaluation. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and expository nonfiction, honors students will master comprehension, use evidence to conduct in-depth literary analysis, examine and critique how authors develop ideas in a variety of genres, and synthesize ideas across multiple texts. In addition to activities offered to students in core courses, honors students are given additional opportunities to create and participate in project-based learning activities, including creating a time travel brochure and an original interpretation of William Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Hamlet. Honors students will read a range of classic texts, including Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, “Politics and the English Language” by George Orwell, and William Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Hamlet. In addition to full length works, students will read a variety of excerpts, including readings from Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, The Smithsonian’s History of America in 101 Objects, and Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, as well as a variety of short fiction, speeches, and poetry

BIOLOGY HONORS

This compelling full-year course engages students in a rigorous honors-level curriculum that emphasizes the study of life and its real-world applications. This course examines biological concepts in more depth than general biology and provides a solid foundation for collegiate-level coursework. Course components include biochemistry, cellular structures and functions, genetics and heredity, bioengineering, evolution, structures and functions of the human body, and ecology. Throughout the course, students participate in a variety of interactive and hands-on laboratory activities that enhance concept knowledge and develop scientific process skills, including scientific research and technical writing.

CHEMISTRY HONORS

This rigorous full-year course provides students with an engaging honors-level curriculum that emphasizes mathematical problem solving and practical applications of chemistry. Topics are examined in greater detail than general chemistry in order to prepare students for college-level coursework. Course components include atomic theory and structure, chemical bonding, states and changes of matter, chemical and redox reactions, stoichiometry, the gas laws, solutions, acids and bases, and nuclear and organic chemistry. Throughout the course, students participate in a variety of interactive and hands-on laboratory activities that enhance concept knowledge and develop scientific process skills, including scientific research and technical writing.

PHYSICS HONORS

This rigorous full-year course provides students with an engaging honors-level curriculum that emphasizes abstract reasoning and applications of physics concepts to real-world scenarios. Topics are examined in greater detail than general physics and provide a solid foundation for collegiate-level coursework. Course components include one- and two-dimensional motion, momentum, energy and thermodynamics, harmonic motion, waves, electricity, magnetism, and nuclear and modern physics. Throughout the course, students participate in a variety of interactive and hands-on laboratory activities that enhance concept knowledge and develop scientific process skills, including scientific research and technical writing.

ECONOMICS HONORS

From creating graphs to reach equilibrium to learning to manage a bank account, students will take part in a more rigorous semester long study of the principles and processes of economics in the American system. Students begin with an introduction of basic economic concepts then move on to an in-depth study of microeconomic principles. Students showcase their understanding of supply, demand, and economic choices by completing a case study on starting a business. Students then turn to macroeconomic concepts, government policies, and entrepreneurship. With this foundation, students create a proposal for public policies and programs in a small developing nation. Students continue their study of Economics by examining global economic concepts such as trade barriers and agreements. This Honors course concludes with a unit on personal finance. Students will learn more about topics such as taxation, financial institutions, credit, and money management. Students extend their knowledge of personal financial planning by creating a successful budget. Throughout the course, economic theory is introduced, demonstrated, and reinforced through real-life scenarios and examples. In assignments and project-based lessons, students learn to apply critical thinking skills while making practical economic choices.

SURVEY OF UNITED STATES HISTORY HONORS

From the first colonial settlements through today’s society, students will embark on a more rigorous yearlong study of our nation’s history. Students investigate the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed our country into the nation it is today. Units progress through the course by taking an in-depth look at events such as those surrounding the creation of the Constitution, the Civil War, our nation’s involvement in World War I and II, as well as cultural aspects of our society. From writing about life in the colonies to analyzing landmark Supreme Court decisions, students are better equipped to compare what happened in yesterday’s world with what is going on in our modern era. Throughout this Honors course, students continuously analyze primary and secondary sources relating to the period of study. Incorporating activities from other disciplines gives students the opportunity to connect history to other subjects. Students read excerpts from novels like Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle, and poetry such as “The New Colossus” by Emma Lazarus. Activities such as writing a petition and analyzing various Presidents’ speeches encourage students to perform throughout the course at a higher level.

SURVEY OF WORLD HISTORY HONORS

From the first civilizations through today’s society, students will embark on a more rigorous yearlong study of our world’s history. Students investigate classical civilizations in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, and Asia while exploring the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. Units progress through the course by touching on world wars, imperialism, and cultural aspects of each region’s society. From creating an explorer’s notebook to mapping out how Europe changed after World War II, students are better equipped to compare what happened in yesterday’s world with what is going on in our modern era. Throughout this Honors course, students continuously analyze primary and secondary sources relating to the region and era of study. Incorporating activities from other disciplines gives students the opportunity to connect history to other subjects. Students read excerpts from novels such as Charles Dickens’ Hard Times and excerpts from memoirs like that of Ji-li Jiang’s, titled Red Scarf Girl. Projects such as writing a summary of a current event based on an ancient religion encourage students to perform throughout the course at a higher level.

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT HONORS

From the origins of democracy through our nation’s public policies, students will take part in a more rigorous semester long study of the principles and procedures of the United States’ government. Students begin by taking an in-depth look at the creation of the Constitution and analyze the Amendments contained therein. Supreme Court cases that have challenged what our constitutional rights are and their lasting impact is the next topic covered in the course. Students then study the structure and duties of our government, including writing an informative essay about a federal agency. Students then explore the duties of an American citizen and finally examine the various public policies our government is responsible for. From writing about the purpose of government to analyzing landmark Supreme Court decisions, students are better equipped to understand how the federal, state, and local governments work as well as how citizens should engage with each other in today’s society. Throughout this Honors course, students continuously analyze primary and secondary sources, including political cartoons, essays, and judicial opinions. Projects such as creating a political cartoon and taking part in a debate about voter ID laws encourage students to perform throughout the course at a higher level.

UNITED STATES HISTORY I HONORS

From the first colonial settlements through the Gilded Age and industrialization, students will embark on a more rigorous yearlong study of the beginnings of our nation’s history. Students investigate Edgenuity Course Catalog PAGE 34 Honors Courses the political, social, cultural, intellectual, and technological revolutions of the United States that have helped to lay the foundation of our country. Units progress through the course by starting with an in-depth look at the first settlements and European explorations that eventually led to colonization. Students study the events and outcomes of the American Revolution, as well as the creation of the Constitution and the beginnings of our government. Manifest destiny and slavery are the next topics students analyze that lead into a closer look at the Civil War and how it changed our nation. From writing about the Lincoln-Douglas debates to analyzing the effects of immigration and urbanization, students are better equipped to understand what happened during our nation’s beginnings. Throughout this Honors course, students continuously analyze primary and secondary sources relating to the period of study. Incorporating activities from other disciplines gives students the opportunity to connect history to other subjects. Students read selections like “Your People Live Only Upon Cod,” and poetry such as “The New Colossus” by Emma Lazarus. Activities such as writing a personal narrative as either a slave or newly freed person and analyzing a report on child labor encourage students to perform throughout the course at a higher level.

UNITED STATES HISTORY II HONORS

From the Industrial Revolution through today’s society, students will embark on a more rigorous yearlong study of our country’s modern history. Students investigate the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed our country into the nation it is today. Units progress through the course by taking an in-depth look at events such as those surrounding our nation’s expansion westward, civil rights in various eras, our nation’s involvement in World War I and II, as well as cultural aspects of our society. From analyzing landmark Supreme Court decisions to writing about advancements in technology, students are better equipped to compare what happened in yesterday’s world with what is going on in our modern era. Throughout this Honors course, students continuously analyze primary and secondary sources relating to the period of study. Incorporating activities from other disciplines gives students the opportunity to connect history to other subjects. Students read excerpts from novels like Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle, and Geronimo’s autobiography, Story of His Life. Activities such as writing about how the frontier is part of America’s history and national character and analyzing various Presidents’ speeches encourage students to perform throughout the course at a higher level.

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