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MS U.S. HISTORY

Offering an interactive and comprehensive overview of American history, this course engages and inspires students to learn about the rich and diverse history of America’s native peoples, early European colonization and settlement in America, and the creation of a new nation through the American Revolution. Middle school students enrolled in this course will closely examine major changes brought about by the nation’s reconstruction, industrialization, urbanization, and progressive reforms and consider the implications each of these events had on the expansion of the United States’ global influence through modern times. Over the course of two semesters, interesting course content encourages students to think carefully about the challenges and opportunities facing the United States in the twenty-first century.

MS WORLD HISTORY

Providing students with an opportunity to learn the diverse history that has shaped our world, this course delves into the evolution of civilization from the rise of ancient empires through the twenty first century. Middle school students enrolled in this exciting and informative course investigate the development of medieval societies, the effects of the Renaissance and the Reformation, and the progress made during various periods of revolution, industrialization, urbanization, and reform. Over the course of two semesters, students analyze effects of political conflicts and social issues on the continuing development and interdependence among nations in the modern world.

MS ANCIENT WORLD HISTORY

This yearlong course covers ancient peoples, cultures, civilizations, and innovations through approximately 300 CE. Students are introduced to historical inquiry skills for application to studies of ancient civilizations. Students explore physical and human geography to explain how ancient people interacted with the environment and understand how civilizations developed. Students study early economies and how trade relations affected culture and language. In later lessons, students examine how early forms of government and technology have had a lasting influence on modern civilization. Throughout the course, students analyze maps and primary sources to identify patterns and make connections across time and space. Students are exposed to diverse cultures and learn to explore the past with historical empathy.

MS CIVICS, GOVERNMENT, & ECONOMICS

Exploring the structure of the United States government on a national, state, and local level, this course challenges students to learn and understand fundamental concepts and philosophies that led to the creation of the United States Constitution. Students enrolled in this two-semester course analyze the political process, political parties, and influences that affect them both. Engaging, interactive content introduces economic concepts and encourages students to explore government and economics on a global scale. By instilling a thorough understanding of government and economics, this course inspires students to investigate what it means to be an American citizen.

MS WORLD CULTURES & GEOGRAPHY

Designed to introduce students to the study of geography, this course helps students master important concepts in physical and human geography. Comprehensive and organized by region, this two-semester middle school course helps students understand the Earth’s physical and human diversity. Students analyze population and settlement patterns and evaluate the ways that human activities modify the physical environment. While studying humans around the world, students compare development, standards of living, systems of government, and economic factors across the globe. In addition, students gain a rich understanding of global cultures and the historical factors that have shaped the world around them. All units in the course are parallel and include studies in physical and human geography, ancient cultures, regional studies, and modern issues.

SURVEY OF WORLD HISTORY

This yearlong course examines the major events and turning points of world history from ancient times to the present. Students investigate the development of classical civilizations in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, and Asia, and they explore the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. At the end of the course, students conduct a rigorous study of modern history, allowing them to draw connections between past events and contemporary issues. The use of recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allows students to draw connections between the past and the present, among cultures, and among multiple perspectives. Throughout the course, students use a variety of primary and secondary sources, including legal documents, essays, historical writings, and political cartoons to evaluate the reliability of historical evidence and to draw conclusions about historical events.

MODERN WORLD HISTORY

This yearlong course examines the major events and turning points of world history from the Enlightenment to the present. Edgenuity Course Catalog PAGE 14 Social Studies Courses Students investigate the foundational ideas that shaped the modern world in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Americas, and then explore the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. This rigorous study of modern history examines recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allowing students to draw connections between the past and the present, across cultures, and among multiple perspectives. Students use a variety of primary and secondary sources, including legal documents, essays, historical writings, and political cartoons to evaluate the reliability of historical evidence and to draw conclusions about historical events. Students also sharpen their writing skills in shorter tasks and assignments, and practice outlining and drafting skills by writing full informative and argumentative essays.

SURVEY OF U.S. HISTORY

This one-year high school course presents a cohesive and comprehensive overview of the history of the United States, surveying the major events and turning points of U.S. history as it moves from the Era of Exploration through modern times. As students examine each era of history, they will analyze primary sources and carefully research events to gain a clearer understanding of the factors that have shaped U.S. history. In early units, students will assess the foundations of U.S. democracy while examining crucial documents. In later units, students will examine the effects of territorial expansion, the Civil War, and the rise of industrialization. They will also assess the outcomes of economic trends and the connections between culture and government. As the course draws to a close, students will focus their studies on the causes of cultural and political change in the modern age. Throughout the course, students will learn the importance of cultural diversity while examining history from different perspectives.

U.S. HISTORY I

U.S. History I is a yearlong course that dynamically explores the people, places, and events that shaped early United States history. This course stretches from the Era of Exploration through the Industrial Revolution, leading students through a careful examination of the defining moments that shaped the nation of today. Students begin by exploring the colonization of the New World and examining the foundations of colonial society. As they study the early history of the United States, students will learn critical-thinking skills by examining the constitutional foundations of U.S. government. Recurring themes such as territorial expansion, the rise of industrialization, and the significance of slavery will be examined in the context of how these issues contributed to the Civil War and Reconstruction.

U.S. HISTORY II

U.S. History II is a yearlong course that examines the major events and turning points of U.S. history from the Industrial Revolution through the modern age. The course leads students toward a clearer understanding of the patterns, processes, and people that have shaped U.S. history. As students progress through each era of modern U.S. history, they will study the impact of dynamic leadership and economic and political change on our country’s rise to global prominence. Students will also examine the influence of social and political movements on societal change and the importance of modern cultural and political developments. Recurring themes lead students to draw connections between the past and the present, between cultures, and among multiple perspectives.

AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY

This course surveys the history of the United States from the settlement of the New World to modern times and prepares students for the AP United States History Exam. The course emphasizes themes such as national identity, economic transformation, immigration, politics, international relations, geography, and social and cultural change. Students learn to assess historical materials, weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship, and analyze and express historical understanding in writing.

U.S. GOVERNMENT*

This semester-long course provides students with a practical understanding of the principles and procedures of government. The course begins by establishing the origins and founding principles of American government. After a rigorous review of the Constitution and its amendments, students investigate the development and extension of civil rights and liberties. Lessons also introduce influential Supreme Court decisions to demonstrate the impact and importance of constitutional rights. The course builds on this foundation by guiding students through the function of government today and the role of citizens in the civic process and culminates in an examination of public policy and the roles of citizens and organizations in promoting policy changes. Throughout the course, students examine primary and secondary sources, including political cartoons, essays, and judicial opinions. Students also sharpen their writing skills in shorter tasks and assignments and practice outlining and drafting skills by writing full informative and argumentative essays.

AP® UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS*

This one-semester college-level course is designed to prepare students for the AP United States Government and Politics exam. Students will study the Constitutional underpinnings and structure of the United States government, issues of politics and political parties, and topics in civil rights and public policy, demonstrating their understanding and acquisition of skills through written work, project-based activities, and practice exams.

Available as either a semester or a full year, this course invites students to broaden their understanding of how economic concepts apply to their everyday lives—including microeconomic and macroeconomic theory and the characteristics of mixed-market economies, the role of government in a free-enterprise system and the global economy, and personal finance strategies. Throughout the course, students apply critical-thinking skills while making practical economic choices. Students also master literacy skills through rigorous reading and writing activities. Students analyze data displays and write routinely and responsively in tasks and assignments that are based on scenarios, texts, activities, and examples. In more extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write full-length essays in informative and argumentative formats.

HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

Examining current global issues that impact our world today, this course takes a thematic approach to understanding the development of human systems, human understanding of the world, and human social organization. Divided into two semesters, this high school course will challenge students to develop geographic skills, including learning to interpret maps, analyze data, and compare theories. Offering interactive content that will grow students’ understanding of the development of modern civilization and human systems—from the agricultural revolution to the technological revolution—this course encourages students to analyze economic trends as well as compare global markets and urban environments.

AP® HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

Human Geography is a college-level course designed to prepare students for the AP Human Geography Exam. The goal of the course is to provide students with a geographic perspective through which to view the world. Through a combination of direct instruction, documentary videos, and online readings, students will explore geographic concepts, theories, and models; human environment interactions; and interactions among human systems. Topics covered include population, culture, political organization of space, agricultural land use, industrialization, and urban land use. Students will demonstrate their understanding and acquisition of skills through essays, document-based questions, student collaborative activities, and practice AP exams.

AP® PSYCHOLOGY

Psychology will introduce students to the systematic study of the behavior and mental processes of human means and animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with the major fields within psychology. Students also learn about the methods psychologists use in their science and practice. The major aim of this course is to provide each student with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in most introductory college psychology courses. In addition, this course has been designed to help students successfully achieve a passing score on the AP Psychology exam.

AP® WORLD HISTORY: MODERN

This advanced study of world history explores historical themes common to societies around the world and across time periods, from 1200 to the present day. Emphasis is placed on document analysis, historical thinking skills, reasoning processes, and essay writing. Students will demonstrate their understanding and acquisition of skills through written work, document-based questions, project based activities, and practice exams.

* Courses marked with an asterisk are one-semester courses.

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