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These one-semester, college-level courses are ACE® CREDIT® recommended for potential transfer to more than 2,000 colleges and universities. Every secondary institution sets its own policies for credit acceptance; contact colleges and universities to learn more about their policies for dual-credit courses

 

ACCOUNTING*

In this course, students will master the fundamental principles and procedures of the modern practice of accounting. They will gain practical experience with bookkeeping and preparing financial reports within the context of operating a sole proprietorship. Students will use a problem solving approach to actively apply key concepts of introductory accounting to realistic case studies. Upon course completion, students will be able to identify accounting fundamentals, analyze financial reporting, apply principles of accounting for merchandising operations as well as analyze advanced accounting topics.

APPROACHES TO STUDYING RELIGIONS*

This course will illustrate the basic concepts integral to the study of religion and understanding how these concepts apply in real world situations. Student will explore key components of religions as they apply to a range of different belief systems and analyze the role of religion in modern society. Upon course completion, students will be able to identify key approaches to religious study; identify common elements of religions; analyze religion’s impact on individuals, society, and the world; and evaluate social, ethical, and cultural topics through the lens of religion.

COLLEGE ALGEBRA*

Students in this course will build mastery around linear, nonlinear, and other mathematical functions that include algebraic, graphic, and numeric properties. Students will demonstrate the application of these concepts in real-life scenarios. Upon course completion, students will be able to perform mathematical functions with real numbers; apply mathematical concepts to linear equations, inequalities, and series/sequences; and apply mathematical concepts to linear representations and systems of linear equations and inequalities. Additionally, they will be able to apply mathematical concepts to algebraic expressions, quadratic equations, functions, and non-linear equations.

CONFLICT RESOLUTION*

This course will teach students the basic concepts of conflict resolution and how to apply these concepts in real-world situations as well as their own lives. Students will explore key theories and skills associated with conflict resolution in a variety of contexts, including organizational, intercultural, family, and interpersonal. Upon course completion, students will be able to describe conflict resolution and theories of conflict, examine the fundamentals of conflict order, and develop conflict resolution skills. They will be able to interpret the role of culture and gender in conflict resolution, analyze group conflict, and apply the strategies of conflict resolution to real-world scenarios.

HUMAN BIOLOGY*

Students participating in this course will analyze fundamental biological principles related to the human body. Course topics include the molecular and cellular basis of life, genetics, organ systems, and the impact of nutrition and exercise on human health. Upon course completion, students will be able to describe basic human biology concepts, including skeletal and muscular systems as well as urinary, endocrine, and reproductive systems. They will be able analyze nervous and sensory systems as related to human health and analyze respiratory, circulatory, immune, and digestive systems. Students will also be able to describe genetics and biotechnology and their application.

INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY*

In this course, students will master the basic art history elements of the Western world, from prehistoric to modern times. Students will explore art exhibits, analyze buildings and architecture, and examine art in everyday life. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to describe art history, examine art from 22,000 BC through 400 AD, distinguish art from 401 AD through 1450 AD, and analyze art from 1451 AD through 1800 AD. They will also be able to categorize art from 1801 AD through 1900 AD and interpret art from 1901 AD through the present.

INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY*

In this course, students will become familiar with the basic principles of psychology and the scientific method. Students will study a variety of topics, including the brain, learning and memory, personality, social influence, child and lifespan development, and psychopathology. Students will demonstrate the application of these topics to everyday situations. Upon course completion, students will be able to identify foundational philosophies, therapies, and specializations in the field of psychology; analyze developmental psychology across lifespans; and identify theories of personality and personality assessment. They will also be able to articulate scientific research methodology, analytical approaches in the field of psychology, and how the brain and psychological factors impact mental health and behavior, as well as classify psychological disorders and their impact on well-being.

INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY*

This course will encompass the basic principles of sociology. Students will learn a variety of topics including sociological theory and basic research methods, as well as specific theories of culture, deviance, social interaction, diversity, stratification, education, technology, and health in modern society. Students will demonstrate the application of these topics to everyday situations. Upon course completion, students will be able to identify foundational philosophies, theories, and methods in the field of sociology and apply principles of culture and deviance to real-life scenarios. They will be able to analyze social interaction and collective behavior in a real-world context; identify and apply elements of diversity, stratification, and inequality in real life; and analyze sociological perspectives on elements of modern society.

INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS*

Students in this course will master the basic principles of statistics. The course covers topics that include statistical principles, research methodologies, data analysis, and hypothesis testing. Students will demonstrate the application of these topics to everyday situations. Upon course completion, students will be able to grasp and identify key principles of statistical reasoning and methods; apply concepts of data and data representation in a real-world context; calculate variation and central tendency and recognize patterns in distributions; and apply concepts of probability and risk in real-life scenarios. Additionally, students will be able to determine correlation and causation and distinguish between them in context. They will be able to apply concepts of hypothesis testing and utilize t-tests, z-tests, and ANOVA in real-world situations.

MACROECONOMICS*

Students in this course will explore and interpret the behavior of economies and countries at both national and international levels. Through this exploration, students will learn how to evaluate decisions on monetary and fiscal policy. Students will also learn how to apply conceptual principles of macroeconomics in practical ways to everyday life.

MICROECONOMICS*

This course will focus on the behavior of individual consumers and firms in the marketplace and will help students learn how to evaluate decisions, both public and private, with an eye towards production, consumption, and transfer of wealth. Students will also learn how to apply conceptual principles of microeconomics in practical ways to everyday life. Upon course completion, students will be able to describe economics, examine the consumer, analyze businesses, and interpret market interactions as they relate to consumers and businesses.

PROJECT MANAGEMENT*

Students in this course will go through the life cycle of managing a project, from designing the scope to completing the project and celebrating success. Along the way, students will gain applied experience with project planning as well as managing project resources and risks.

VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS*

This course will cover basic concepts of visual design and how to apply these concepts in context. Students will explore visual theories and key elements and principles of design, with an emphasis on color, typography, and layout. They will also learn how to analyze a visual design and understand visual design’s role in today’s society. Upon course completion, students will be able to examine basic visual design concepts, distinguish the principles and elements of design, analyze the role of visual design in communication, and communicate effectively through visual design.

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